JAMES L. GELVIN

                          DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY

                  UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGELES

 

EDUCATION 

PhD., Harvard University, Cambridge, MA., History and Middle Eastern

Studies, 1992.

 

M.A., Columbia University School of International and Public Affairs, New

York, NY., 1985.

 

B.A., Columbia College, Columbia University, New York, NY., 1983.

 

RECENT TEACHING EXPERIENCE

Sheikh Zayed Visiting Associate Professor of Islamic Studies, American University of Beirut, 2002-2003.

 

Associate Professor, Department of History, University of California at Los Angeles, 1999-.

 

Assistant Professor, Department of History, University of California at

Los Angeles, 1995-1999.

 

RECENT HONORS AND GRANTS

Department of Education/Title VI Travel/Research Grant, Summer 2004.

 

Research Grant, G.E. von Grunebaum Center for Near Eastern Studies,

Summer 2003.

 

Faculty Research Grant, Department of History, UCLA, Winter 2003.

 

UCLA Academic Senate Grant, Annually 1998-Present.

 

Fellowship, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, 1999-2000.

 

President’s Research Fellowship in the Humanities, University of

California, 1999-2000.

 

Faculty Excellence Award, presented by the UCLA chapter of Mortar Board National Senior Honor Society, 1998. 

 

PUBLICATIONS

 

BOOKS

Israel‑Palestine Conflict: One Hundred Years of War (Cambridge, ENG:

Cambridge University Press, 2005).

 

Editor, Religion and Society in the Late Ottoman Empire (forthcoming).

 

The Modern Middle East: A History (New York: Oxford University Press, 2004).

 

Divided Loyalties: Nationalism and Mass Politics in Syria at the Close of

Empire (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998).

 

ARTICLES

“Inventing Syria” (under review).

 


“Globalization, Religion, and Politics in the Middle East” (under review).

 

“Islamism and Nationalism: Common Roots, Common Destinies,” Beiruter

Blaetter: Mitteilungen des Orient-Institutes Beirut, 10-11 (March 2004).

 

“Zionism and the Representation of ‘Jewish Palestine’ at the New York World’s Fair, 1939-1940” The International History Review XXII:1 (March 2000).

 

"Modernity and Its Discontents: On the Durability of Nationalism in the Arab Middle East," Nations and Nationalism 5:1 (January 1999).

 

"The League of Nations and the Question of National Identity in the

Fertile Crescent," in World Affairs (Summer 1995), 35-43.

 

"The Social Origins of Popular Nationalism in Syria: Evidence for a New

Framework," in International Journal of Middle East Studies   (November 1994), 645-662.

 

"Demonstrating Communities in Post-Ottoman Syria," in The Journal of

Interdisciplinary History XXV:I (Summer 1994), 23-44.

 

CHAPTERS IN EDITED VOLUMES

“Collective Memory and Nationalist Narrative: Recounting the “Syrian

Experience” of the First World War,” in Najwa Al-Qattan (ed.), The First World War in the Middle East and Collective Memory.

 

“Modernities, Religion, and the Construction of Gender in Early Twentieth Century Damascus,” in James L. Gelvin (ed.), Religion and Society in the Late Ottoman Empire (forthcoming).

 

“Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc?: Reassessing the Lineages of Nationalism in Bilad al-Sham,” in Thomas Philipp and Christoph Schumann (eds.), From the Syrian Land to the State of Syria (Würtzburg: ERGON Verlag, forthcoming 2004).

 

“T.E. Lawrence and Historical Representation,“ in Charles Stang (ed.), The Waking Dream of T.E. Lawrence: Essays on His Life, Literature, and Legacy (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 2002).

 

“Secularism and Religion in the Arab Middle East: Reinventing Islam in a

World of Nation States,” in Derek R. Peterson and Darren Walhof (eds.), The Invention of Religion: Rethinking Belief and Politics in History (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2002), 115-130.

 

“Developmentalism, Revolution, and Freedom in the Arab Middle East: The Cases of Egypt, Syria, and Iraq,” in Robert H. Taylor (ed.), The Idea of Freedom in Asia and Africa (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2002), 62-96.

 

"(Re)Presenting Nations: Demonstrations and Nationalisms in Pre-Mandate Syria," in F. Moge Gocek (ed.), Social Constructions of Nationalism in the Middle East (Albany: SUNY Press, 2002).

 

“Napoleon in Egypt as History and Polemic,” in Irene Bierman (ed.), Napoleon in Egypt (Reading, ENG: Ithaca Press, 2003), 135-156.

 

“The Other Arab Nationalism: Syrian/Arab Populism in Its Historical and


International Contexts" in James Jankowski and Israel Gershoni (eds.), Rethinking Nationalisms in the Arab World (New York: Columbia University Press, 1997), 231-248.

 

"The Ironic Legacy of the King-Crane Commission," in David W. Lesch (ed.),

The United States in the Middle East: A Historical Reassessment (Boulder: Westview Press, 1995), 11-27.

 

BOOK REVIEWS

Ussama Makdisi, The Culture of Sectarianism: Community, History, and Violence in Nineteenth-Century Lebanon, American Historical Review 107:1 (February 2002).

 

Eugene L. Rogan, Frontiers of the State in the Late Ottoman Empire: Transjordan, 1850-1921, Middle East Journal 54:4 (Autumn 2000).

 

Elizabeth Thompson, Colonial Citizens: Republican Rights, Paternal

Privilege, and Gender in French Syria and Lebanon, The International

History Review 22:4 (December 2000).

 

Kathleen Christison, Perceptions of Palestine: Their Influence on Middle

East Policy, Political Science Quarterly 115:1 (Spring 2000).

 

Hasan Kayali, Arabs and Young Turks: Ottomanism, Arabism, and Islamism inthe Ottoman Empire, 1908-1918, International Journal of Middle East Studies (February 1999).

 

Nicolaos Van Dam, The Struggle for Power in Syria: Politics and Society under Asad and the Bacth Party, Middle East Studies Association Bulletin 31 (1997).

 

Tamara Sonn, Interpreting Islam: Bandali Jawzi’s Islamic Intellectual History, The Middle East Journal 4 (Autumn 1997).

 

Rashid Khalidi et al., The Origins of Arab Nationalism, British Journal of Middle Eastern Studies 20:1 (1993). 

 

OTHER

“Palestine, Zionism, and the Arab-Israeli Conflict”: twenty-four part C.D.

and V.H.S. lecture series for the Teaching Company, Inc.

 

RECENT CONFERENCES

“Inventing Syria,” Conference: “Syria after Iraq,” UCLA, April/May 2004.

 

Respondent, “Beyond the Clash of Civilizations: Missionaries, Conversions, and Tolerance in the Ottoman Empire,” Rice University, April 2004.

 

“Islamism and Nationalism: Common Roots, Common Destinies,” Conference: “The Arab State of Islam,” UCLA, March 2004.

 

“Middle East History as Global History,” California Middle East Social and Cultural Historical Association (CALMESCHA), February 2004.

D

“dGlobalization, Ossama Bin Laden, and American Failures in the Middle East, 1971-2003” Conference on “Other Globalizations: Histories, Trans-regionalisms, and Cultural Formations,” Rockefeller Foundation/U.C. Humanities Research Institute, University of    California, Santa Cruz, February 2004.


“Nation and State in the Modern Mediterranean: A Structural Approach,” Conference: “Mediterranean Studies, Identities and Tensions,” American University in Beirut, June 2003.

 

“Nationalism and Islamism: Conflict or Concord?,” Conference Series: “The

Islamic World: A Century of Transformation,” University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana, September 2002.

 

“Rethinking Religion in the Late Ottoman Empire,” “Modernities, Religion, and the Construction of Gender in Early Twentieth-Century Damascus,” Conference: “Religion and Society in the Late Ottoman Empire,” UCLA, April 2002.

 

“Collective Memory and Nationalist Narrative: Recounting the ‘Syrian

Experience’ of the First World War,” Middle East Studies Association

Conference, November 2001.

 

Chair and Discussant, “The Concept of Civilization in the Middle East,” Middle East Studies Association Conference, November 2001.

 

“Alternative Modernities and Constructions of Gender in Post-Hamidian Damascus,” Ninth International Congress of Economic and Social History of Turkey, Dubrovnik, Croatia, August 2001.

 

Chair and Discussant, “Rethinking Labor History in the Middle East,”

American Historical Association, January 2001.

 

“Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc?: Reassessing the Lineages of Nationalism in Bilad al-Sham,” Third Conference on Bilad al-Sham, Erlangen, Germany, July 2000. 

 

“Secularism and Religion in the Arab Middle East: Reinventing Islam in a

World of Nation States,” Conference: After Secularism/Religion: Interpretation, History, and Politics, MacArthur Program on Global Change, Sustainability and Justice, University of Minnesota, May 2000.

 

“What T.E. Lawrence Got Wrong and Why: Lessons for a New Millenium,”

Conference: T.E. Lawrence at the End of the Twentieth Century, Santa Clara University, May 2000.

 

“‘Pious’ Ulama, ‘Overly-Europeanized Deceivers,’ and the Debate about Women in Early Twentieth-Century Damascus,” Syria Studies Group,      Georgetown University, April 2000.

 

“Zionism and the Representation of ‘Jewish Palestine’ at the 1939 New York World’s Fair,” Middle East Studies Association Conference, November 1999.

 

“Developmentalism, Revolution, and Freedom in the Arab Middle East: The Cases of Egypt, Syria, and Iraq,” Center for the History of Freedom, Washington University, October 1999.

 

“Rethinking Nationalism in the Arab Middle East (No, Seriously): Some Complaints and Some Research Problems,” Interdisciplinary Conference: The Middle East: Ancient to Modern Times, University of California,    Santa Barbara, March 1999.

 

“The Primordialization of Syrian Identity,” American Historical Association Conference, January 1999.


“Peasants (and Townsmen) into Syrians: The Emergence of Territorial Nationalism in Syria,” Middle East Studies Association Conference, December 1998.

 

INVITED LECTURES

“Globalization, Religion, and Politics in the Middle East,” Clarke Center for the Interdisciplinary Study of Contemporary Issues (Dickinson College)/Carnegie Council on Ethics and International Affairs, April      2004.

 

“Rethinking Islamic Movements,” University of Cyprus, Nicosia, Cyprus, May 2003.

 

“Nationalism and Islamism: Common Roots, Common Destinies,” Orient-Institut der Deutschen Morgenländischen Gesellschaft, Beirut, Lebanon, April 2003.

 

“Nationalism and Islamism: Common Roots, Common Destinies,” Center for Arab and Middle Eastern Studies, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon, November 2002.

 

“‘The Power of Religion’: Why We Don’t Have a Clue and What Might Be Done to Clue Us in,” University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana, September 2002.

 

“Alternative Modernities and the Construction of Gender in Late Ottoman Damascus,” Feminist Research Seminar, UCLA, February 2002.

 

“‘The Power of Religion’: Why We Don’t Have a Clue and What Might Be Done to Clue Us in,” G.E. von Grunebaum Center for Near East Studies, UCLA, December 2001.

 

“Secularism and Religion in the Arab Middle East: Reinventing Islam in a

World of Nation States,” UCLA Center for the Study of Religion, January 2001.

 

“Understanding the Roots of 11 September” (2001-2002): Chapman College; Los

Angeles Pierce College; University of California, Irvine; University of California, Riverside; University of California, Santa Barbara.

 

“‘Pious’ Ulama, ‘Overly-Europeanized Deceivers,’ and the Debate about Women in Early Twentieth-Century Damascus,” University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, March 2000.

 

“Culture Wars, Early Twentieth-Century Damascus Style,” Pennsylvania State University, February 2000.

 

“The Resiliance of Nationalism in the Arab Middle East,” University of California, Berkeley, January 1999.