Language Socialization

 

Anthropology M248/Applied Linguistics M224

Instructor:  E. Ochs and L. de León

Winter 2008

Thursdays 2-4:50 Haines 314

E-mail: eochs@anthro.ucla.edu  and  lourdes_deleonp@yahoo.com

Phone:  (310) 825-0984                  (310) 267-4250

                                                         Tuesday, 3-5pm, Haines 318A          Monday 3-5pm, Haines 308

                                                         and by appointment                        and by appointment

 

Readings:

Š  Required textbooks available at the UCLA Bookstore:

 

 (1) Schieffelin, Bambi (1990/2007)  The Give and Take of Everyday Life: Language Socialization of Kaluli 
Children.  New York: Cambridge University Press.


 (2) Language Socialization Across Cultures.  Edited by Bambi Schieffelin 
and Elinor Ochs. New York: Cambridge University Press.  First published
1986.  Last reprinted 1995.



(3) Kulick, Don (1992) Language Shift and Cultural Reproduction: Socialization, Self, and 
Syncretism in a Papua New Guinean Village.  New York:
 Cambridge University Press.

 

Additional required and recommended articles available at the class website

http://www.sscnet.ucla.edu/08W/anthrom248-1/

 

Course Requirements:

1.     Whole Class Commentaries

Everyone in the seminar is expected to write commentaries (1 single-spaced page only) for the weeks specified in the course syllabus (i.e., January 17 through March 13). Commentaries should discuss one issue as it applies across 2 or more readings. Clearly indicate the page numbers when referencing passage(s) relevant to the point you’re making. E-mail the commentaries to the instructors and research assistant [Inma Garcia-Sanchez igarcias@humnet.ucla.edu] by 2 PM on the Tuesday preceding each class meeting. Please bring copies of the articles with you to class.

 

2. Group Presentations

Seminar participants are expected to work in small groups to present in-class data analyses of issues, questions relevant to the week readings (approx 15 mins per presentation plus 15 mins discussion).

 

 

            In-class group presentations will involve:

1)    A critical discussion of one theme from the readings (displayed on Power Point).

2)    An illustration of the discussion points with 1 data example from outside the weekly readings.  The data sample can include either a brief audio/video recording and/or a written text. Audio & video recordings should be digitized and transcribed. Transcripts and video should be displayed on Power Point and transcripts also reproduced on handouts for all seminar participants. (***Bring recorded data with you to class, keyed to beginning of data segment!)

3)  Each group of presenters will be paired with corresponding discussants, who will briefly comment upon the analysis presented before it is opened to general class discussion.

 

      3. Research Proposal

Write a 12-page (double-spaced) proposal specifying how language socialization illuminates a research topic of interest to you. The 12-page limit does not include the bibliography. Do not add appendices beyond the page limit. 

      The proposal will consist of 4 sections:

I. Aims of Study (approx. 1.5 pages)

-     Propose a research study that can be fruitfully pursued through a language socialization framework

-       Situate the proposed language socialization study in relation to a population or a site and motivate your selection.

-       In a few sentences, state why the project is timely and important in relation to current theoretical debates/issues

-       Specify 2-3 research questions related to the general research topic that the proposed project will address

II. Theoretical Background (approx. 4 pages)

-       Introduce 2-3 domains of inquiry related to your proposed study

-       Concisely review salient studies within each of these domains

-       Within each of these domains of inquiry, specify how your research project will advance understanding

III. Methodology  (approx. 1.5 pages)

-       Data Collection (corpus, procedures, duration)

-       Data Analysis (specify how collected corpus will be analyzed in relation to the questions you are addressing)

IV. Pilot Study  (approx. 5 pages)

-       Present a small scale analysis that you have carried out related to your proposed study:

-     Specify your pilot research focus and corpus

-     Provide analysis, using empirical data to illustrate preliminary

observations and generalizations

V. Bibliography 

 

 

 

Proposal Drafts: [For additional assistance, contact igarcias@humnet.ucla.edu

Office Hours, Wednesdays, 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. and by appointment. 825-1092]

 

Sections I & III:         Due February 7       

Sections II & IV:        Due February 28                                                                 

Bring three hard copies to class and email copies as attachments

to eochs@anthro.ucla.edu, lourdes_deleonp@yahoo.com, igarcias@humnet.ucla.edu

Final Proposal:         Due, Monday, March 17, 2PM

Three hard copies in instructor’s mailbox, 341 Haines Hall. 

 

Final Grade

Team presentations and class discussions            60 %

Final paper                                                                40 %

 

 

January 10     Introduction to the Enterprise

Methodologies for studying socialization.

 

January 17     Cornerstones of Language Socialization

Concepts of socialization; scope of socialization; linguistic and interactional resources for socialization

Readings:

Ochs, E. & Schieffelin, B.B. (1984). Language Acquisition and Socialization: Three Developmental Stories and Their Implications. In R. Schweder & R. LeVine (eds.), Culture Theory: Essays on Mind, Self and Emotion. New York: Cambridge University Press, 276-320.

• Ochs, E. (2002). Becoming a Speaker of Culture. In C. Kramsch (ed.), Language Socialization and Language Acquisition: Ecological Perspectives. New York: Continuum Press, 99-120.

• Garrett, P. and Baquedano-Lopez, P. (2002). "Language Socialization:  Reproduction and Continuity, Transformation and Change." Annual Review of Anthopology 31: 339-61.

Related Readings:

Š  Kulick, D. and Schieffelin, B. (2004). Language Socialization. A Companion to Linguistic Anthropology. A. Duranti. Oxford, Blackwell: 349-368.

Assignment:

Everyone in Class:

Formulate an issue arising from the readings that will generate an interesting discussion.  Send your commentary raising the issue and relevant passages from the readings to the instructors and research assistant as an attachment by Tuesday, January 15, 2PM. 

 

 

 

 

January 24     Socialization into/through Attention I

Cultural learning, intersubjectivity, scaffolding, apprenticeship.        

 [*There will also be an in-class discussion of proposal writing in preparation for class final project.]

Readings:

• Rogoff, B. (1998). Cognition as a Collaborative Process. In W. Damon, D. Kuhn & R.S. Siegler (eds.), Handbook of Child Psychology. Vol. 2: Cognition, Perception, and Language. New York: Wiley, 679-744.

Tomasello, M., Carpenter, M., Call, J., Behne, T., and Moll, H. (2005) Understanding and sharing intentions: The origins of cultural cognition Behavioral And Brain Sciences 28, 675–735.

Kidwell, M. & Zimmerman, D.H. (2007) Joint attention as action. Journal of Pragmatics 39, 592–611

•Duranti, A. (2007).  Husserl, Anthropology, and the Notion of Intersubjectivity.

Invited Lecture, The Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna.

Related Readings:

•Rogoff, B., Paradise, R., Arauz, R. M., Correa-Chavez, M., & Angelillo, C. (2003). Firsthand Learning through Intent Participation. Annual Review of Psychology, 54, 175-203.

Assignment:

Everyone in Class:

Formulate an issue arising from the readings that will generate an interesting discussion.  Send your commentary raising the issue and relevant passages from the readings to the instructors and research assistant as an attachment by Tuesday, January 22, 2PM. 

 

January 31 Socialization into/through Attention II

The corporeal positioning and communicative modalities of children with others

Readings:

• Ochs, E., Solomon, O., & Sterponi, L. (2005) Limitations and Transformations of Habitus in Child-Directed Communication.  Discourse Studies 7(4-5), 547-583.

• DeLeón, L. (1998). The Emergent Participant: Interactive Patterns in the Socialization of Tzotzil (Mayan) Infants. Journal of Linguistic Anthropology, 8(2), 131-161.

• Schieffelin, B. B. (1990). The Give and Take of Everyday Life: Language Socialization of Kaluli Children. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press. Chapters 1-4.

Related Readings:

• Estigarribia, B., & Clark, E. V. (2007/in press) Getting and maintaining attention in talk to young children. Journal of Child Language 34.

• Tomasello, M. Carpenter, M. and Liszkowski, U. (2007) A New Look at Infant Pointing. Child Development, Volume 78, Number 3, 705 – 722.

Watson-Gegeo, K. and Gegeo, D. (1986) Calling Out and Repeating Routines in the Language Socialization of Basotho Children, in Schieffelin, B.B. and Ochs, E. (eds.) Language Socialization across Cultures. Cambridge University Press, 17-50.

Assignment:

Everyone in Class:

Formulate an issue arising from the readings that will generate an interesting discussion.  Send your commentary raising the issue and relevant passages from the readings to the instructors and research assistant as an attachment by Tuesday, January 29, 2PM. 

 

February 7 Socialization into/through Emotion I

Verbal and non-verbal forms, practices and genres of emotion used with and by novices: anger, threats, teasing, 

Readings:

Š  deLeon,  L. (Forthcoming) The Arrival of the Soul:  Language, Person, and and Childhood Socialization among the Tzotzil Maya of Zanacantan, Chapter 6 “Becoming a Moral Person”.

• Brown, P. (2002) Everyone has to lie in Tzeltal, in Blum-Kulka, S and Snow, C, (eds.) Talking to Adults. Erlbaum, 241-275.

• Schieffelin, B. B. (1986). Teasing and Shaming in Kaluli Children's Interactions, in Schieffelin, B.B. and Ochs, E. (eds.)Language Socialization across Cultures. Cambridge U. Press, 165-181.

• Ochs, E. (1986). From Feelings to Grammar: A Samoan Case Study, in Schieffelin, B.B. and Ochs, E. (eds.) Language Socialization Across Cultures. Cambridge University Press, 251-272.

Related Readings:

• Schieffelin, B. B. (1990). The Give and Take of Everyday Life: Language Socialization of Kaluli Children. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press. Chapter 6.

• Miller, P. (1986). Teasing as Language Socialization and Verbal Play in a White Working-Class Community, in Schieffelin, B.B. and Ochs, E. (eds.) Language Socialization Across Cultures. Cambridge University Press, 199-212.

Assignment:

Everyone in Class:

1.     Formulate an issue arising from the readings that will generate an interesting discussion.  Send your commentary raising the issue and relevant passages from the readings to the instructors and research assistant as an attachment by Tuesday, February 5, 2PM.

 

2.     Turn in first drafts of proposal Sections I: Aims of Study & III: Methodology.

            Bring three hard copies to class and email copies as attachments on   February 7 to eochs@anthro.ucla.edu eochs@anthro.ucla.edu,          lourdes_deleonp@yahoo.com,             igarcias@humnet.ucla.edu

 

February 14    Socialization into/through Emotion II

Verbal and non-verbal forms, practices and genres of emotion used with and by novices: fear, suffering, lament/complaint, exhortation

**Progress report from Genres of Emotion Seminar

Readings:

Š  deLeon,  L. (Forthcoming) The Arrival of the Soul:  Language, Person, and Childhood Socialization among the Tzotzil Maya of Zanacantan, Chapter 5 “Becoming a Person: “The Soul is Coming’”: Learning To Inhabit Space through Fear”

Š  Wilce, J. (1998) Eloquence in Trouble:  The Poetics and Politics of Complaint in Rural Bangladesh, Chapter 6  “Learning To Tell Troubles:  Socialization of Crying and Troubles Telling”, Oxford University Press, 104-118.

Š  Throop, C. J. (2005) Suffering and Sentiment: Explaining the Vicissitudes of Pain and Experience in Yap (Waqab), Federated States of Micronesia. Unpublished Ph.D. Dissertation, UCLA, Chapter 12: “Dysphoric Moments:  A Case Study”, pp.578-619.

Assignment

1. Group A Presenters:

Each team in this group:

1) Discuss a passage from the readings. Reproduce passage on an overhead transparency or Power Point to show in class

2) Illustrate, amplify, and/or critique the passage with a brief excerpt of language socialization data from outside the readings. If possible, show video or audio recorded data plus transcript of recording.

Group B Discussants:

Responsible for responding to the issues/questions and data analyses presented by Group A.

 

February 21 Socialization into/through Authoritative Practices

Socialization into and through language practices that attempt to establish social asymmetry and control how novices act, think, and feel.

Readings:

• Moore, Leslie. (2004).  Learning Languages by Heart:  Second Language Socialization in a Fulbe Community (Maroua, Cameroon), Unpublished Ph.D. Dissertation, University of California Los Angeles. Chapter 5: Guided Repetition As Social Practice, 269-313.

Goodwin, M. H. (2006) Participation, affect, and trajectory in family

directive/response sequences. Talk and Text 26-4/5, pp. 513-541.

• Howard, Kathryn (2005).  Socializing Respect at School in Northern Thailand. Working Papers in Educational Linguistics, 20, 1, 1-30.

• He, A. (2000). The Grammatical and Interactional Organization of Teachers’ Directives:  Implications for Socialization for Chinese-American Children. Linguistics & Education, 11 (2), 119-140.

Related Readings

• He, A. W. (2001). The Language of Ambiguity: Practices in Chinese Language Heritage Classes. Discourse Studies, 3(1), 75-96.

• Cook, H. M. (1990). The Role of the Japanese Sentence-final Particle no in the Socialization of Children. Multilingua, 9(4), 377-395.

Assignment

Group B Presenters:

Each team in this Group:

1) Discuss a passage from the readings. Reproduce passage on an overhead transparency or Power Point to show in class

2) Illustrate, amplify, and/or critique the passage with a brief excerpt of language socialization data from outside the readings. If possible, show video or audio recorded data plus transcript of recording.

Group A Discussants:

Responsible for responding to the issues/questions and data analyses presented by Group B.

 

 

February 28    Socialization into/through Ways of Knowing

Socialization into and through practices of problem-solving and moral reasoning.

Readings:

• Ochs, E. & Taylor, C. (1992). Science at Dinner. In C. Kramsch & S. McConnell-Ginet (eds.), Text and Context:  Cross-Disciplinary: Perspectives on Language Study. Lexington, Mass.: D.C. Heath. Pp. 29-45.

Developmental Psychology, 38(1), 55-66.

• Sterponi, L. (2003). Account Episodes in Family Discourse: the Making of Morality in Everyday Interaction. Discourse Studies, 5(1), 79-100.

• Heath, S. B. (1986). What No Bedtime Story Means: Narrative Skills at Home and School, in Schieffelin, B.B. and Ochs, E. (eds.) Language Socialization Across Cultures. Cambridge University Press, 97-124.

Related Readings:

• Rymes, B. (1996). Rights to Advise: Advice as an Emergent Phenomenon in Student-Teacher Talk. Linguistics and Education, 8, 409-437.         

• Ochs, E. & Jacoby, S. (1997). Down to the Wire:  The Cultural Clock of Physicists and the Discourse of Consensus. Language in Society, 26(4), 479-506.

• Sterponi, L. & Santagata, R. (2000). Mistakes in the Classroom and at the Dinner Table: A Comparison between Socialization Practices in Italy and United States. Crossroads of Language, Interaction and Culture, 3, 57-72.

• Ochs, E. & Taylor, C. (1992). Family Narrative as Political Activity. Discourse and Society, 3(3), 301-340.

• Chavajay,P. & Rogoff, B. (2002).  Schooling and Traditional Collaborative Social Organization of Problem Solving by Mayan Mothers and Children.

Assignment:

1. Everyone in Class:

Turn in first drafts of proposal Sections II: Theoretical Background & IV: Pilot Study. Bring three hard copies to class and email copies as attachments on         February 7 to eochs@anthro.ucla.edu, lourdes_deleonp@yahoo.com, igarcias@humnet.ucla.edu

 

2.  Group A Presenters:

1) Discuss a passage from the readings. Reproduce passage on an overhead transparency or Power Point to show in class

2) Illustrate, amplify, and/or critique the passage with a brief excerpt of language socialization data from outside the readings. If possible, show video or audio recorded data plus transcript of recording.

Group B Discussants:

Responsible for responding to the issues/questions and data analyses presented by Group A.

 

 

March 6   Language Socialization and Language Contact

Language socialization practices that impact language and culture continuity and change.  Guest Speaker:  Inma García-Sánchez

Readings:

Š  Kulick, D.  (1992) Language Shift and Cultural Reproduction: Socialization, Self and Syncretism in a Papua New Guinean Village, Chapters 1-6.

• Garrett, Paul (2005) What a Language Is Good for: Language Socialization, Language Shift, and the Persistence of Code-Specific Genres in St. Lucia. Language in Society 34, 327-361.

Related Readings:

• Paugh, A. (2001). "Creole Day is Every Day":  Language Socialization, Shift, and Ideologies in Dominica, West Indies. Unpublished Ph.D. Dissertation, New York University: Chapter 1; Introduction & Chapter VI:  Language Choice and Personhood:  Theories of Child Rearing and Ways of Talking to Children in the Village, 1-54, 263-342.

Assignment:

Everyone in Class:

Formulate an issue arising from the readings that will generate an interesting discussion.  Send your commentary raising the issue and relevant passages from the readings to the instructors and research assistant as an attachment by Tuesday, March 4, 2PM. 

 

March 13  Socialization into/through Ideologies of Self & Other

Socialization into and through language practices that index and construct subjectivities. Relationships, and identification with a social group. Guest Speaker:  Wendy Klein

Readings:

• Garrett, P. (2007) “Language Socialization and the Reproduction of Bilingual Subjectivities”. Bilingualism:  A Social Approach. Ed. M.Heller. New York: Palgrave MacMillan.

• Baquedano-López, P. (2000). Narrating Community in Doctrina Classes. Narrative Inquiry, 10(2), 429-452.

• Klein, W.L. (2008) Turban Narratives: Discourses of Identification and Differences among Punjabi Sikh Families in Los Angeles, in A. Lo and A. Reyes (eds) Towards a Linguistic Anthropology of Asian-Pacific America. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

• Fader, A. (2001). Literacy, Bilingualism, and Gender in Hasidic Community. Linguistics and Education, 12 (3), 261-283.

Related Readings:

• Kulick, D.  (1992) Language Shift and Cultural Reproduction: Socialization, Self and Syncretism in a Papua New Guinean Village. Chapter 7.

Š  Zentella, A.C. Multiple Codes Multiple Identities. Kids Talk: Strategic Language Use in Later Childhood. Oxford Studies in Sociolinguistics.

• Miller, P., Potts, R., Fung, H., Hoogstra, L. & Mintz, J. (1990). Narrative Practices and the Social Construction of Self in Childhood. American Ethnologist, 17(2), 292-311.

• Eckert, P. & McConnell-Ginet, S. (1995). Constructing Meaning, Constructing Selves:  Snapshots of Language, Gender and Class from Belten High. In K. Hall & M. Bucholtz (eds.), Gender Articulated, New York: Routledge. Pp. 469-507.

• Mehan, H. (1996). The Construction of an LD Student: A Case Study in the Politics of Representation. In M. Silverstein & G. Urban (eds.), Natural Histories of Discourse. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Pp. 253-276.

Assignment:

Group B Presenters:

1) Discuss a passage from the readings. Reproduce passage on an overhead transparency or Power Point to show in class

2) Illustrate, amplify, and/or critique the passage with a brief excerpt of language socialization data from outside the readings. If possible, show video or audio recorded data plus transcript of recording.

Group A Discussants:

Responsible for responding to the issues/questions and data analyses presented by Group B.

 

           

 

March 17, 2PM: Final Proposal Due

(Three hard copies in instructors’ mailbox)